An Ubuntu Touch Lockscreen Refresh

It’s been a while since I’ve blogged about any unity8 work. Lately I’ve been updating the visual look and feel of the Ubuntu Touch lockscreen. I’m digging the new look, so I wanted to share.

Note that these have not landed or been fully reviewed. Looks may change before hitting devices.

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A new lighter default background and snazzier infographic.
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A proper passphrase box like on the tablet or desktop.
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And use a more consistent look and feel for passcodes too.
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With a custom background image, we use white infographic bubbles. (image credit)

In-App Purchases Available in the Ubuntu Store

I haven’t seen anyone else trumpeting this online. So I guess I will. 🙂

Since Ubuntu Touch’s OTA 10 update, apps can offer in-app purchases! Yay!

Besides allowing someone to write the next Candy Crush, this also means that app authors can stop providing separate “donation” versions of their app. Which means less busywork for authors, reviews are all on the same app, and less confusion for users.

Documentation is available from the QtPurchasing module docs. And remember to update your app’s framework to 15.04.4 (OTA 10).

If you want to see it in action, I’ve enabled a donation button in my “Lone Wolf” game app. No need to actually donate, it just might be interesting to see how it looks to the user (hit the “night mode” button in the upper right to see it — donating turns on the night mode feature).

Speaking of which, if you actually do something based on a purchase (like enabling a feature), the QtPurchasing docs recommend saving purchase information in “persistent storage.” I’ve just stuffed a boolean in a Settings object. But that’s easy for a user to modify themselves on disk. I don’t care about donation fraud, but I’m curious how I should better protect against that, in case I do something more interesting with IAP.

FastMail is the Perfect Gmail Alternative

If, for whatever reason, you’re looking to switch from Gmail, I think you’ll love FastMail.

Its workflow, interface, and features will be immediately recognizable to you: it has conversation view, archiving, spam detection, categorization, filtering, keyboard shortcuts, a modern and fast web UI (ditto for mobile), fast search, calendars, contacts, two-factor authentication, and the option to use your own domain name.

I’ve looked around and having even just that first one (a conversation view) is a shocking rarity in either webmail or mail apps. Let alone all those features.

Switching is easy too. You can import email directly from Gmail and can just export/import any calendars and contacts from Google. Plus, for any shared calendars that you still want to host at Google, you can have FastMail show them and sync any changes.

The big catch of course is that it isn’t free. But it’s not expensive either.

I know this post reads like an ad, but I’m just genuinely pleased so far (and I’m intentionally not using a referral code on the link above). Hopefully the next person doesn’t have to do as much comparison shopping as I did.

The Delayed Public License

Say you’re an open source developer and you want to write a mobile app (in my case, for the Ubuntu phone).

You put some effort into it, and you think it would be nice if you could get a little revenue back for your efforts. Mobile stores make it very easy to do this, either from upfront payments, in-app payments (IAP), or ads.

The problem is that if you open source your app, anyone can fork it, strip the payments or ads (or re-code the app to pay themselves instead), and re-upload the stripped app to the store. Which, while it may not seem fair, is something that you explicitly allowed by choosing an open source license.

I don’t like the forced choice between either receiving no renumeration for your time or closing your source code. If I die or lose interest, I’d still like the world at large to be able to build upon my code.

Open source developers have been used to receiving no renumeration for their time for quite a while. 🙂 But it’d be nice to change that, or at least allow those that are interested in doing so to try to earn some revenue by traditional means.

This isn’t an issue that was invented by mobile stores. You always could have had IAP or ads in your open source project and have had to worry about Debian maintainers stripping them out or being forked. It’s just that using IAP or ads before mobile platforms existed was very difficult.

The Delayed Public License

Some Ubuntu app developers were talking about this issue recently, and we came up with the Delayed Public License (DPL) [1]. It’s basically a meta license, that toggles between all-rights-reserved and a FOSS license after a set amount of time. In plain terms, something like:

All rights reserved. Every code commit can be licensed as GPL-3 one year after its publication.

  • You can still host your code in a public repository. Even though the code is public, it wouldn’t be legal for anyone to use it until that year is up. People are still welcome to fork your code, but they have to fork it one year back in the commit history.
  • You would release your app to the store as a closed source app. You can do that despite the DPL, because you own the copyright to the whole project. But people could still get the code from your repository.
  • Unlike a closed source project, you can still accept patches. Though you’d need a CLA of some sort.
  • The FOSS trigger is automatic. So you can’t forget or change your mind. And it’s easy to do; you don’t need some code escrow service.
  • When using the DPL, you obviously aren’t stuck with GPL-3 or a delay of one year. You can choose a different FOSS license and time period to suit your own needs.

While this meta license wouldn’t be be OSI approved [2], it still feels open source.

I’d love to hear more legally-binding ways of phrasing the license. Tying each VCS commit to its own publication timer might not be trivial to express legally.

Thoughts?

[1] The idea came from a discussion between Michael Zanetti, Stuart Langridge, Sturm Flut, Ted Gould, and me. Credit for the name goes to Sturm Flut.
[2] Which means you have to be careful about picking a hosting provider. Launchpad for example will only host you for free if you use a FOSS license. GitLab would allow a DPL project. I’m not sure about GitHub: you have to pay for private repositories, but I don’t know about a public, non-open-source repository.

Nonogram Database

I am working on a nonogram (aka griddler, paint by number, picross, hanjie, etc) app for Ubuntu Touch.

Along the way, I’ve discovered that there are very few freely distributable puzzles floating around.

In an attempt to change that (for myself and future app developers), I’m collecting the ones I can find in one place.

If anyone knows of any good caches of freely distributable puzzles, please let me know and I’ll add them.

In the meantime, I’m going to strip files from the few open source apps I know about and see if I can get members of some popular nonogram sites to release their puzzles under a free license.

Snapifying Normal Ubuntu Packages

I’ve been playing with Ubuntu Snappy and wanted a way to bundle up traditional Ubuntu programs into a snap package.

So I wrote a script to do so! Introducing deb2snap. It isn’t perfect, but it can do some neat stuff already.

Full instructions and examples can be found on the homepage, but to whet your appetite:

./deb2snap fortune
./deb2snap --mir mir_demo_client_fingerpaint
./deb2snap --xmir xfreerdp

Tech Board Nomination

So I’ve been nominated for the Ubuntu Technical Board. Modesty and a touch of impostor syndrome prevent me from strongly endorsing myself. Though if voted in, I would certainly work hard at it. Here’s a bit about where I sit in Ubuntuland for those who are voting, but don’t know me well:

I’ve been involved in Ubuntu for about 5 and half years. I’ve worked in Canonical’s OEM team, as well as the Foundation and Desktop teams and now the Unity team. I’m a core dev and a member of the MIR team (main inclusion reviews, not the Mir display server). I maintain the default Ubuntu backup program (Déjà Dup / duplicity) and the default Ubuntu login screen. Sort of a jack of all trades, master of none kinda guy.

But really, let me talk real quick about the other candidates and why they would be awesome choices.

Martin Pitt is ridiculously talented and a super nice guy; he knows a little bit of everything; he even has his own fan club, for goodness sake. Loïc Minier is equally helpful and experienced, and is nowadays doing great things on the Touch side of things. Adam Conrad has a great eye for detail; I work with him often doing MIR work. Steve Langasek does great work on the Foundations team and always knows where the Ubuntu bodies are buried. Marc Deslauriers is super smart, appropriately cautious, and has a pleasingly big picture view. Kees Cook, Clint Byrum, Stéphane Graber, and Benjamin Drung have all been very helpful and nice when I’ve interacted with them, but I don’t happen to know them personally enough to be able to write a little blurb.

Point is, all of those nominees rock and would be great tech board members.

New Music Sources

This past year, I’ve realized I like finding new music more than I previously realized. I figure it might be interesting to share my own sources for new music and maybe receive some good recommendations from others.

Boing Boing

They only sometimes cover music, but that just means that when they do, it’s usually a notable song.

The Hairpin

This is actually a women’s interest blog. But they have good taste, so I generally like any featured music.

Refinery 29

This is a San Francisco fashion, entertainment, and shopping blog. They post a lot about non-music issues, so I recommend filtering by “This is our Jam”, which is the phrase they use when highlighting a new song.

This Is My Jam

Speaking of which, the site “This Is My Jam” is a neat social media music-sharing site. You point it at a song that you’re into right now (say, on Youtube) and it will add that song to your friends’ feeds. After a week it goes away, and you pick a new jam. I’m user “mterry” on it!

The recommendations here are pretty hit or miss, because people tend to post songs that are interesting to them, not necessarily songs that are likely to be interesting to others. But it’s a lot more personal than the other sites for sure.

Lower Frequencies

An actual, honest-to-goodness music recommendation blog. Daily updates and sometimes a link to the mp3 is provided too. They tend to feature more mellow works.

Reddit: r/ListenToThis

This is a subreddit for music recommendations from fellow redditors. In truth, I haven’t found it to be super useful, but it is eclectic. Lower Frequencies puts all their songs here too.

blocSonic netBlocs

This one isn’t a music recommendation blog, but rather a site that puts out regular compilations of interesting free web music. Quite variable quality but with a good mix of genres. I’ve found some gems here.

Rub Radio

This is a monthly collection of 15 to 20 hip hop songs. Worth the listen.

Best of Bootie

Again, this one isn’t a blog, but rather a yearly collection of the best mashups featured in the weekly San Francisco mashup club event Bootie. If mashups are interesting to you, these are worth downloading.

Radio Paradise

This is my go-to Internet radio station. You can play it right from your browser or they have links to play from your media player.